Queensland – 1998

The 1998 Queensland state election is shaping up to be one of the most unpredictable and hard-fought political contests in recent history. With a diverse array of parties and candidates vying for power, the race is wide open, and the outcome is far from certain.

The incumbent National-Liberal coalition government, which unexpectedly gaining power in 1996, is now battling to maintain its grip on power. Meanwhile, the center-left Labor Party is mounting a strong challenge, while the controversial right-wing populist One Nation party led by Pauline Hanson is making a serious push to gain a foothold in the state parliament. Smaller players like the Australian Democrats and Greens are also hoping to leverage voter discontent to secure crucial seats.

The stakes are high, with the future direction of Queensland’s policies on crucial issues like gun reform, indigenous rights, immigration, and the economy all hanging in the balance. Analysts predict record voter turnout as Queenslanders grapple with a complex and consequential set of choices.

With millions of dollars in campaign spending, fiery rhetoric, and shifting alliances, the 1998 Queensland election promises to be a dramatic and defining moment in the state’s political landscape. The final results could reverberate across the country, making this one of the most closely watched state elections in recent memory.

Who will lead Queensland into the new century?

South Australia – 2018

South Australians once again find themselves at a pivotal moment, as they prepare to cast their votes and determine the direction of the state for the next term. The Weatherill Labor government is seeking an unprecedented fifth term in office after a tumultuous last four years rocked by scandals, political turmoil, and statewide blackouts. However, lingering discontent over the energy crisis and cost of living pressures have given momentum to Leader Steven Marshall’s Liberal opposition in their quest to regain Government House. Into this scenario has emerged the insurgent SA Best party led by Former Senator Nick Xenophon, tapping into frustrations but lacking a history of governance. With preferences set to play a major role once more, SA Best is hoping to hold the balance of power regardless of who wins the largest share of the vote, Whoever emerges victorious on March 17 will inherit enormous responsibility to stabilize the budget, stimulate new jobs, and regain public trust in politics at a critical juncture for the state. Once the dust settles after another tightly fought campaign, who will earn the opportunity to lead South Australia bravely into the next decade?

This election unpredictable nature can offer some historic results:

  • Will Premier Weatherill succeed in his quest to win another term and give the Labor party an unprecedented 5th term for the party?
  • Will Steven Marshall’s Liberals come back after 16 years long in opposition?
  • Will South Australians decide it’s time to ditch the duopoly and elect Nick Xenophon and his SA-Best to government?

Western Australia 1950 – Wind Of Change

Alt-History Mod Alert!

In 1933, West Australians voted in favor of secession from Australia, in the midst of the Depression. After the Western Australian delegation’s petition was accepted by the UK Parliament, the flag of the federation was lowered in Perth and replaced by the Blue Ensign, officially ending the federation between Western Australia and the Australian Federation. 17 years on, the country had moved on and prospered under the boom created by the expansion of the agriculture industry and the mining industry, spurred by the economic policy of the Latham government, which had been in power since 1939. The Prime Minister had decided to call a double dissolution election to advance his agenda, after the Senate kept blocking his legislation to ban the Communist Party, which had continued to grow since the end of the war. Labor, under the new leadership of Frank Wise, hoped to retake government after a series of losses and try to convince Western Australia it was time for change. Meanwhile, a new party emerged as a result of Labor’s left pivot and the NCA’s long rule – the Liberal Democratic Party, led by Oscar Wells, the most famous mining magnate in Western Australia. The party hoped to provide a political home for the Social Liberals and Fiscal Conservatives who might be alienated by the two-party system.

Disclaimer: The Mod is based on this referendum https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/1933_Western_Australian_state_election point of divergence is when the Joint Select Committee in the British Parliament accepted the petition presented by the Western Australia delegation led by Premier Mitchell

New Zealand 2017 – Time To Decided

It’s time for New Zealanders to decide the country’s future once again! After 9 years of leadership by John Key through both good and bad times, he has decided to retire from politics, handing over the reigns of power to his deputy and former leader Bill English. What seemed like a cakewalk to victory has turned into a battle of popularity and experience, as Andrew Little suddenly resigned as Labour leader just weeks before election day. Labour decided to coalesce around the young and charismatic Jacinda Ardern, electing her as their new leader. Coming from mid-20% polls, Ardern has a big task ahead of her to overcome. How will New Zealand decide?

The election’s unique nature allows for some hypothetical scenarios:

  • What if Andrew Little had persevered through the bad polling numbers and led Labour to the end?
  • What if Winston Peters decided not to do the unexpected and formed a coalition with National?
  • What if Peter Dunne continued fighting in Ōhāriu even though polls showed he might not make it back this time?
  • What if the coalition arrangements changed, with a Red-Green coalition aided by Uncle Winnie?
  • What if National decided it was time to have an economically responsible and environmentally responsible government by forming a coalition with the Greens?

Because of the lack of an MMP system in PMI, we decided to get a little creative by converting the list seats into actual electorate seats. You can battle it out here in the marginal seats, which are basically voters who are undecided but voted for said party last time and might be able to be persuaded to vote for you this time around. To make it a tad bit more realistic, I have made it as hard as possible for you to get the “Base” Party support seats – for example, the National has 12 “Base seats” which would be hard to get. Every party that makes it into the threshold in the 2014 election has this. It’s not perfect, but it’s the best we can do under the circumstances.

2023 Utah’s 2nd Congressional District Special Election


Following the resignation of Representative Chris Stewart, a special election has been called for Utah’s 2nd congressional district, with Celeste Maloy, Chris Stewart’s legal counsel, winning an upset victory in the republican primary as democrats rallied behind state senator Kathleen Riebe. While Utah’s 2nd is broadly considered a safe republican seat, Maloy is seeking to capitalize on anti-Biden sentiments in order to overperform both Donald Trump and Chris Stewart, legitimizing the GOP’s hopes for a win in 2024, while Riebe is looking for a dramatic upset victory that will buck pollsters and pundits alike, silencing Biden’s critics on both the left and right.

Parties and Candidates:

Republican – Celeste Maloy
Democratic – Kathleen Riebe
Libertarian – Brad Green
Constitution – Cassie Easley
United Utah – January Walker
Independent – Perry Myers
Independent – Joseph Buchman

Michigan + Wisconsin County Maps – Made for PI 2020!

I was tired of the old style of map, and wanted to create my own. Since the editor doesn’t support targeted selection yet, you can only upload it as the map. But you can still just put it in if you want.

This is a predecessor for a new series I’m working on. The only states I’ve completed so far is Wisconsin and Michigan, so if anyone wants to create more, let me know!

1988+ – United States – After Reagan

Compatible with 3.1.1

*Note: This version of the 1988 campaign is substantially updated. Changes include adding unique flavor, via actual events for each candidate in the general/primary election, new HD portraits, new issues, adding missing/alt-history candidates, and adding a full, working and accurate primary on both sides, with the correct turnout for each primary/caucus.

The 1988 campaign featured an open contest on both the Republican and Democratic sides, as Republican Pres. Ronald Reagan was entering the last year of his second term. Numerous contenders on the Democratic side entered the race. Commentators referred derisively to them as “The Seven Dwarfs.” They included former Arizona Gov. Bruce Babbitt, Delaware Sen. Joe Biden, Massachusetts Gov. Michael Dukakis, Missouri Rep. Richard Gephardt, Tennessee Sen. Al Gore, civil rights leader Jesse Jackson, Illinois Sen. Paul Simon and the disgraced, “Eight Dwarf” former frontrunner, former senator Gary Hart of Colorado, who dropped out because of a sex scandal, reentered the race and then entered electoral obscurity. Two candidates who were somewhat more inspiring had decided not to run: Massachusetts Sen. Ted Kennedy; and New York Gov. Mario Cuomo, who simply declined to run. The Republicans, seeking a candidate who could match the stature and electability of Reagan, were similarly at a loss. The nominal front-runner, George Bush, suffered from a reputation as a “wimp” who in 22 years of public life—as a former representative, U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, director of the Central Intelligence Agency, and, for more than seven years, Reagan’s vice president—had failed to distinguish himself as anything more than a docile instrument of someone else’s policy. There were three interesting Republican alternatives: Bob Dole of Kansas, the Senate minority leader, who was respected for his wit and intelligence though considered by some to be overly acerbic; former New York representative Jack Kemp, revered among many conservatives as Reagan’s true ideological heir; and the Rev. Pat Robertson, a popular televangelist. None of the three, however, made it through the primary season. With the Reagan era drawing to a close, the wide open race has top names both sides of the political spectrum running for the top job. Liberal and Conservative Reverends, Hawks and Doves in both parties, which way will America turn?

Download:

1988+ (zip) (link to mediafire)

Screenshots:

Democratic Primary:

Republican Primary:

General Election:

Simulation: